When I’m asked what will be happening with the Free Cities concept in the future, I would say that the most important thing is that the internet is shaping and changing the various known feelings such as belonging, such as origin, such as who I am, what am I for?… for most youngsters around the world… and over time, we will see a complete change of what it means to be a human in a society.

Kris Kaleta portrait2 scaled
This week on the Free Cities Podcast I’m in Poland talking with Kris Kaleta.

Kris is a digital nomad and technologist who is, amongst other things, doing some absolutely fascinating post-graduate research on virtual libertarian communities.

Our conversation touches on many aspects of his work from digital politics to emerging governance models and the contemporary phenomenon of online communities manifesting in real life. Kris has been a keen observer of the Free Cities movement since the start so he has a lot of great insights into the future of what many are calling the emerging free market of living together.

Thanks for listening to us. It’s incredibly inspiring for me to watch our listener numbers growing steadily. Don’t forget to reach out if you have and ideas or suggestions for the podcast. I’d love to hear your opinions.

If you would like to listen to us on YouTube, you can also find the podcast here.

Enjoy the conversation.

Automatically Generated Summary

00:00 Introduction

Section Overview: The host introduces the podcast and mentions upcoming episodes.

00:22 Interview with Kris Kaleta

Section Overview: The host interviews Kris Kaleta, a digital nomad and technologist who is doing post-graduate research on virtual libertarian communities.

Background

  • 02:46 Kris has been a digital nomad for several years.
  • 03:09 He started his PhD in England three years ago and hasn’t had a fixed address since then.
  • 03:30 Before that, he lived in Manchester and London for short periods of time.
  • 03:54 Prior to 2015, he lived in Central America, the US, and South America.

Reasons for Nomadic Lifestyle

  • 04:14 Kris enjoys traveling and crossing borders to meet new people and learn about different cultures.
  • 05:06 He is also interested in the digital revolution and how it has made it easier to connect with people from all over the world.

Discussion on Virtual Libertarian Communities

  • 01:47 Kris is doing post-graduate research on virtual libertarian communities.
  • 01:21 They discuss emerging governance models within these communities.
  • 01:47 They talk about online communities manifesting in real life.

06:09 The Internet and Travel

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about how the internet has opened up his mind to new experiences and places. He believes that people limit themselves by not exploring beyond their immediate surroundings.

The Internet as a Tool for Exploration

  • 06:09The speaker was shown photos of different places through the internet, which helped him understand that there are many spaces in the world to explore.
  • 06:29He believes that people limit themselves by only living in one place and not experiencing other cultures or languages.
  • 06:47The speaker explains that he reads books on various topics weekly to broaden his understanding of the world.

07:10 Libertarianism and Travel

Section Overview: In this section, the interviewer asks the speaker about his political beliefs and how they relate to his love for travel. The speaker explains that he is a libertarian but does not impose his beliefs on others.

Understanding Libertarianism

  • 07:10The interviewer asks about the connection between being a libertarian and wanting to travel.
  • 07:32The speaker explains that libertarianism is a philosophical pursuit towards societal organization without state intervention.
  • 08:55He clarifies that while he pursues some libertarian activities in his life, he does not impose them on others.

08:15 Practical Implications of Being an Expat

Section Overview: In this section, the interviewer asks about practical implications of being an expat. The speaker shares anecdotes about getting stopped by police while driving in Europe with a British license after Brexit.

Practical Implications of Being an Expat

  • 08:15The interviewer asks about practical implications of being an expat.
  • 08:37The speaker shares an anecdote about getting stopped by police while driving in Europe with a British license after Brexit.
  • 08:55He explains that being a foreigner can make it harder to govern and follow rules in a new country.

11:31 Introduction and Umbrella Libertarianism

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker introduces himself as an umbrella libertarian who believes in progress. He explains that he thinks differently from mainstream media but is not a fighter.

Speaker’s Beliefs

  • The speaker identifies as an umbrella libertarian who believes in progress.
  • He thinks differently from mainstream media but is not a fighter.

11:55 Classic Liberalism and Human Development

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about his beliefs regarding classic liberalism and human development.

Speaker’s Beliefs

  • The speaker believes that there is a certain point of human development where there will be better organization of things.
  • At present, he identifies more with classic liberalism.

12:17 Free Cities Movement and Digital Nomads

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses his interest in the Free Cities movement and its connection to digital nomads. He also talks about his experience as an analog nomad.

Speaker’s Experience

  • The speaker was an analog nomad who traveled for three years after university.
  • He traveled mainly around Southeast Asia, where Singapore was a hub.
  • When he traveled, they did not have access to email; instead, they used Post Restante to communicate with friends.
  • Post Restante was a way to send letters to central post offices around the world.

Connection between Free Cities Movement and Digital Nomads

  • The speaker sees a big connection between people who are digital nomads and the Free Cities movement.
  • There is a lot of overlap between these two groups.

13:47 Nuts and Bolts of Being a Digital Nomad

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about the nuts and bolts of being a digital nomad.

Speaker’s Experience

  • The speaker is interested in the actual nuts and bolts of being a digital nomad.
  • He believes that many people are also interested in this topic.
  • He now travels as a digital nomad, but he used to travel as an analog nomad.

15:11 Studying and PhD Topic

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about his studies and his PhD topic.

Speaker’s Education

  • The speaker graduated from Manchester, Leicester, London, Krakow, and Porto.
  • He is finishing his PhD in Manchester.

Speaker’s PhD Topic

  • The speaker’s PhD topic is on Polish virtual libertarians.
  • His research focuses on studying the impact of technology on the creation, development, and maintenance of virtual communities.

17:07 The Evolution of Online Communities

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses how online communities have evolved over time and become an integral part of people’s lives.

Creation of Online Communities

  • Online communities were initially created by people who were familiar with computers and phones.
  • Over time, these communities amalgamated with each other and became no different than any other community.

Importance of Online Communities

  • Most people in online communities communicate on a daily basis through virtual means.
  • People perform various aspects of their lives via virtual means such as controlling finances, performing business transactions, and even learning new skills.

19:13 Pursuing Academic Career vs. Traveling

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about his decision to pursue traveling instead of an academic career.

Studying Political Science, International Relations, and Economics

  • The speaker studied political science, international relations, and economics in Poland, England, and Portugal.
  • He found himself uncomfortable with these disciplines because they did not align with what he wanted in life.

Decision to Travel Instead of Pursuing Academic Career

  • The speaker decided to find a job and start traveling instead of pursuing an academic career.
  • He realized that he could not spend his life sitting 50 to 60 hours a week in one building teaching people who do not want to listen about things that are happening around them.

20:43 Pursuing PhD Virtually

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about pursuing a PhD virtually.

Interest in Digital Politics

  • The speaker was interested in digital politics but could not find a suitable program until Manchester University opened up its PhD program on digital politics.

Pursuing PhD Virtually

  • The speaker pursued his PhD virtually by writing to the university and getting accepted into the program.
  • He was able to travel around the world while pursuing his PhD.

22:35 Politics, Digital World and Virtual Communities

Section Overview: The speaker discusses the intersection of politics, digital world and virtual communities. They explain that this is a multi-disciplinary field that includes politics, sociology, cultural studies and technology disciplines.

Research Interests

  • 23:16 The speaker is conducting research on virtual communities using episodic narrative inquiry method to understand how they are created and maintained.
  • 23:37 People interested in virtual communities may be interested in the speaker’s research as it provides insights into the processes inside these communities.
  • 24:37 People interested in populisms and extremisms may also find the speaker’s research interesting as it explores why people become libertarians.

Reasons for Becoming Libertarians

  • 25:50 Some interviewees became libertarians due to their family history with communism or upsetting experiences abroad.
  • 26:40 Others were driven towards libertarianism by right-wing politicians who shaped their reality with narratives that they found fascinating.

Overall, the speaker’s research provides insights into why people become libertarians and how virtual communities function.

28:07 Pursuing Free Market Ideas

Section Overview: The speaker discusses the possibility of pursuing free market ideas and creating a space for individuals to realize their needs within a short distance from Poland.

Interest in Relocating

  • Some individuals are willing to relocate somewhere else with their businesses and activities.
  • Most people moved between areas within Poland due to familiarity with the culture, language, and setting.
  • Some people went abroad to pursue careers in the US or European Parliament.

30:19 Moving to Different Jurisdictions

Section Overview: The speakers discuss whether the concept of moving to a different jurisdiction is something that crosses anyone’s mind.

Gaining Momentum

  • The concept of free jurisdictions is gaining momentum as a response to authoritarianism.
  • The internet has made it easier for people to learn about different concepts and ideas online.
  • Free cities in Honduras are an example of this concept manifesting in real life.

Stability

  • There may be a certain time when people stop moving towards the idea of free jurisdictions due to stability.
  • Most Libertarians in Poland are in their mid 30s, some will start thinking about progression or allocation when they are older and when their kids have enough purchasing power to move abroad.

33:44 The Future of the Free Cities Concept

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses how the internet is shaping and changing various known feelings such as belonging, origins, and identity. They also talk about the negative aspects of social media and how it oversimplifies messages and content. The speaker predicts that in the next 10 to 15 years, there will be a complete change in what it means to be human in society.

Changes in Perception

  • 33:52 The internet is changing various known feelings such as belonging, origins, and identity.
  • 35:03 In the future, people will feel more connected with others online who share their interests rather than physical locations.
  • 36:09 The younger generation will not feel the same sense of belonging to physical locations like London or football clubs.

Influence of Digital Media

  • 35:26 Socialization and learning about the world are heavily influenced by digital media.
  • 35:47 Most kids are on their devices doing multiple things at once and are more capable of digital tasks than older generations.
  • 37:38 Online communities have supreme autonomy especially when using encrypted messaging.

36:56 Manifesting Online Ideas Physically

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about how online communities looking for physical representation may lead to creating new jurisdictions with their own regulations. They discuss how people may build a marketplace of ideas implemented all over the world.

New Jurisdictions

  • 38:06 With newfound concentration of online communities looking for physical representation, people may start creating new jurisdictions with their own regulations.
  • 38:54 People may build a marketplace of ideas implemented all over the world.

39:37 Entrepreneurial Ideas and Free Cities

Section Overview: The speaker discusses the entrepreneurial ideas of people in Poland who want to run their businesses without interference from public administration. They predict that over time, more people will be interested in projects like free cities.

Entrepreneurial Ideas

  • People in Poland have entrepreneurial ideas and want to run their businesses with minimal interference from public administration. 39:37
  • These individuals are not interested in changing anything because they see it as too complicated and requiring too many resources. 40:05

Free Cities

  • Over time, the entry level to projects like Free Cities will lower, making them more accessible. 40:05
  • As people explore different ways of manifesting themselves, they may become interested in blending with non-normal society rather than normal society. 40:32
  • With the opening of the world of information through the internet, people are starting to explore new ideas on a social or cultural level. This exploration will eventually lead to changes on a political and economic level. 41:17

42:35 The Future of the Internet and Society

Section Overview: The speaker discusses two models for the future of the internet – one where each nation has its own sovereign internet, and another where there is a global internet.

Two Models for the Future of the Internet

  • There are two models for the future of the internet – one where each nation has its own sovereign internet (e.g., Russian internet), and another where there is a global internet. 43:19
  • The infrastructure level of the internet is more important than what we see on our desktop or smartphone screens because it controls access to information and other resources.44:02

Sovereign Internet

  • The sovereign internet model limits access to information and resources based on decisions made by administrative groups. For example, the Russian internet only allows access within its borders.43:37

Global Internet

  • The global internet model allows for free access to information and resources across national borders. 43:19

45:30 The Future of the Internet

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses two visions for the future of the internet – a centralized European internet and a decentralized scattered network.

Two Visions for the Future of the Internet

  • 45:48 The first vision is a centralized European internet that would be connected with all other internets such as American, Canadian, and the rest of the world.
  • 46:10 The second vision is a decentralized scattered type of network where devices communicate with each other creating a complete decentralized network. This idea expands on web 3.0 infrastructure.
  • 47:16 These two visions could lead to building two completely different societies because access to information and interaction through the internet is ultimately what shapes society.

48:21 Orwellian Society vs Decentralized Network

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses how society may develop in 100 years based on either an Orwellian centralized authoritarian regime or small satellite places with autonomy.

Two Possible Futures for Society

  • 48:21 One possible future is sclerotic centralized authoritarian regimes in cities where social engineering controls people’s behavior.
  • 49:27 Another possible future is small satellite places with autonomy where communities are easier to control and govern.

49:50 Leaving Earth

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about leaving Earth and how some people will stay while others will go.

Leaving Earth

  • 50:09 Some people will stay on Earth while others will leave to live elsewhere.
  • 50:09 It’s inevitable that some people like Musk or Bezos will push towards leaving Earth in many forms such as Mars or the moon.

50:57 The Future of Societies

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses their personal belief that societies are moving towards smaller communities and territories. They also discuss the possibility of federalization in certain areas and the potential for people to create communities outside of these federalized areas.

Smaller Societies

  • The speaker believes that societies are moving towards smaller communities and territories. 50:57
  • This is based on what they have read and observed in society. 50:57

Federalization

  • The speaker believes that federalization may occur in certain areas such as Africa and Latin America where power struggles are common. 51:23
  • However, they do not believe that this will lead to Fourier societies or extreme forms of control. 51:23

Creating Communities

  • The speaker suggests that people may create communities outside of federalized areas where they can be themselves and realize their potential. 51:45
  • They mention islands in the Caribbean and Europe as potential locations for these communities. 52:05

53:45 Antidotes to Sovereign State Control Networks

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses antidotes to sovereign state control networks, focusing on education, knowledge sharing, information distribution, and public perception.

Education and Knowledge Sharing

  • The speaker believes that education and knowledge sharing are important antidotes to sovereign state control networks. 54:13
  • Access to information has increased significantly over the past 20 years due to technology advancements such as podcasts and YouTube videos.54:38

Information Distribution

  • Giving a space for information distribution will change society significantly by allowing ideas to be shared more easily among people.55:23

Public Perception

  • The speaker believes that public perception is driven by mainstream media and can be influenced by education and knowledge sharing.55:52
  • They mention the banning of bookmakers as an example of how public perception has changed over time.56:14

56:52 The Future of the Internet

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses the potential outcomes of regulating the internet and how it could affect access to information.

Regulating the Internet

  • 56:52 The speaker suggests that banning Facebook or Google from becoming monopolies could bring peace and stability to the virtual space.
  • 57:16 However, he also warns that such regulations could lead to a lack of access to information and hinder progress in research.
  • 57:36 He cites examples of countries where producing a certain vision for the internet led to citizens being unable to gain passports or secure jobs due to their social score.
  • 58:00 Additionally, he notes that excessive regulation could result in paywalls preventing people from accessing knowledge.

Circumnavigating Restrictions

  • 58:43 The speaker acknowledges that it is easy to circumnavigate restrictions on the internet using VPNs or other methods.
  • 59:12 However, he points out that if societal frameworks are bad enough, even with circumnavigation, people may not be able to interact with society as they would like.
  • 59:52 Furthermore, if connections are cut off entirely, people will not be able to access certain information at all.

Decentralized Networks

  • 01:00:40 The speaker argues that decentralized networks like Bitcoin and Noster will continue to exist and provide alternatives even if centralized networks are regulated heavily.
  • 01:01:17 He notes that these alternatives often arise as a consequence of opposing centralized networks.
  • 01:01:40 Finally, he references the film Gatica as an example of how technology can be used for both good and bad purposes.

01:02:28 The Three Markets

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses the three types of markets that exist in society and how they relate to each other.

The Three Types of Markets

  • There are three types of markets: legal, gray area, and dark net. 01:03:09
  • The legal market is self-explanatory and includes all activities that are completely legal. 01:03:09
  • The gray area market involves activities that are not fully illegal but still operate on the edge of legality. Examples include tax evasion or paying less than you should. 01:04:41
  • The dark net market is where illegal activities take place, such as drug trafficking or human trafficking. 01:04:41

01:03:09 Agorism and Silk Road

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about Samuel Edward Konkin III’s libertarian philosophy called Agorism and how it relates to the Silk Road platform.

Agorism Philosophy

  • Samuel Edward Konkin III was a student of Murray Rothbard who created a strand of libertarianism called Agorism. 01:02:49
  • He predicted that society would follow a certain path where there would be three types of markets: legal, gray area, and dark net.01:03:09

Silk Road Platform

  • The Silk Road platform was based on the ideas of Agorism. It was created before its time because if it were created today, it would be much more secure for its owner and users to avoid being traced.01:03:56

01:05:04 Gray Area Societies

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses societies that operate only in the gray area because regulations are impossible to follow.

Gray Area Societies

  • There are societies that operate only in the gray area because regulations are impossible to follow.01:06:06
  • An example of this is Somalia, where people pay for goats with Bitcoin.01:06:49
  • In Kenya, people started using mobile phone minutes as currency because their currency was so devalued.01:07:09

01:06:06 The Future of Markets

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about how the three types of markets will shape society in the future.

The Future of Markets

  • Following the logic of a gray and dark market, the white market will disappear or break into sharp pieces. This will be a reality for many societies in the next 20-25 years.01:06:06
  • Even non-free market societies are experiencing this shift towards gray and dark markets. For example, Hong Kong is currently experiencing this shift due to its political situation.01:06:26

01:07:43 The Gray Market

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker explains what the gray market is and how it relates to finding the best jurisdiction for digital nomads.

Definition of Gray Market

  • The gray market is a way of balancing towards a free market.
  • It involves finding the best jurisdiction for allocating personal income or budget.
  • Digital nomads often register themselves in countries like Paraguay, Bulgaria, or Poland as single entity entrepreneurs to avoid high taxes in their home country.

Legality of Gray Market

  • The gray market is not illegal but involves changing administrative signatures to optimize tax payments.
  • It’s not tax dodging but rather tax avoidance.

Optimization of Budgets

  • Billionaires use complicated schemes to optimize their income and minimize taxation.
  • Individuals can also optimize their budgets by finding the sweet spot between what they’re seeking and what they can do.
  • This optimization starts with finding the best place to have that sweet spot, which might be Paraguay or other countries with lower taxes.

01:10:24 Types of Digital Nomads

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses three types of digital nomads and how they differ from each other.

Three Types of Digital Nomads

  • Type 1: Hired full-time by a company but works remotely from anywhere in the world
  • Type 2: Freelancer providing services to entities all around the world
  • Type 3: Entrepreneur running their own business from anywhere in the world

Differences Between Freelancers and Entrepreneurs

  • Freelancers still need to manage clients and hours while entrepreneurs are completely free.
  • Entrepreneurs can run blockchain companies registered in one country while living in another.

01:13:14 Digital Nomadism and Taxation

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses the common misconception of what digital nomadism is and how it relates to taxation. The speaker explains that there are ways for freelancer entrepreneurs to optimize their administrative and financial operations, but they need to be aware of the different tax laws in various markets.

Tax Optimization for Freelancer Entrepreneurs

  • 01:13:35 Freelancers need to think about ways to optimize their administrative and financial operations in certain markets.
  • 01:14:01 It’s not as easy as registering a freelance business in a country with low taxes like Estonia or Poland. There are certain thresholds that need to be met, such as having a legal income.
  • 01:14:38 Some markets allow freelancers to pay taxes on income earned from Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, while others do not. For example, Paraguay allows this type of income without disclosing its source.
  • 01:14:57 Many people start digital nomadism thinking they can just register in a country with low taxes like Cyprus without realizing they need significant monthly earnings to qualify.

01:16:08 Rise of Digital Nomads

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about the rise of digital nomads and how more people are moving jurisdictions in order to maximize their income. The speaker also discusses how free cities are attracting these types of individuals through legislative incentives.

Growth of Digital Nomads

  • 01:16:30 More people are moving jurisdictions in order to maximize their income once they have an online job.
  • 01:16:55 Free cities are attracting digital nomads through legislative incentives such as low tax rates.

01:17:20 Incentive Packages for Digital Nomads

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses incentive packages that some countries offer to attract digital nomads. The speaker mentions Estonia, Poland, Romania and Spain as examples of countries offering such incentives.

Countries Offering Incentives for Digital Nomads

  • 01:17:43 Some countries like Estonia and Poland offer incentives for digital nomads to come and live there.
  • 01:18:08 Spain recently started advertising these types of incentives for digital nomads.

01:18:45 Registering Your Business and Paying Taxes as a Tax Resident

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses the process of registering your business and paying taxes in a new country. They explain what it means to be a tax resident and how it affects your tax obligations.

Becoming a Tax Resident

  • 01:19:02 To be considered a tax resident, you must spend six months plus one day in that particular area.
  • 01:19:37 Americans are subject to more control than Europeans when registering their businesses in another country.
  • 01:21:02 If you work in Spain but are from the UK, there are certain acts in place to prevent double taxation on your income.

Paying Taxes

  • 01:19:56 Americans will be taxed regardless of whether they are only American citizens or not.
  • 01:21:28 There are legal ways to optimize taxes, but they may still result in higher taxes in some areas.
  • 01:21:49 The speaker suggests that there is a need for an informational tool for people looking to optimize their personal income and taxation.

01:22:58 Learning About Tax Optimization

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about learning more about tax optimization and mentions resources available online.

Resources for Learning About Tax Optimization

  • 01:22:13 The speaker recommends following a German traveler who writes about optimizing taxes and starting companies around the world.
  • 01:22:36 While the speaker considers themselves an amateur at understanding tax optimization strategies, they suggest that there is much to learn from experts like the German traveler mentioned earlier.

Opportunities for Tax Optimization

  • 01:23:24 The speaker believes that there is significant potential for ideas like free cities to build an informational wallet online for people looking to optimize their personal income and taxation.

01:24:06 Free Cities Foundation and Preparing for an Authoritarian Outlook

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses the Free Cities Foundation and its role in promoting a growing movement towards nomadic living. They also address concerns about how families may not be able to easily adopt this lifestyle. The speaker then talks about preparing for an authoritarian outlook and how they believe there will be a parallel growth of people who are unwilling to agree with authoritarian changes.

Free Cities Foundation

  • The Free Cities Foundation is seen as being at the heart of the growing movement towards people moving juristictions to where they are treated best.
  • There is no solution that will appeal to everyone when it comes to families adopting this lifestyle.
  • Over the next 10-15 years, there will be a massive change in how we perceive reality, relations with people, homeland, etc., which will widen the window for people interested in moving jurisdictions.

Preparing for an Authoritarian Outlook

  • There will be a parallel growth of people who are unwilling to agree with authoritarian changes.
  • Learning, reading, and understanding ways to get out of loopholes is key in preparing for an authoritarian outlook.
  • Digital IDs and digital currency controlled by authorities won’t happen in the next five years or probably even longer.
  • The speaker believes they will be on the decentralized arm of things.

01:30:08 Elon Musk’s Starlink and the Future of Online Solutions

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses Elon Musk’s Starlink service and other companies that provide satellite internet or other forms of online solutions without the need for ground infrastructure. The speaker predicts a growth in online solutions as authoritarianism grows, and mentions how communities online can provide information on accessing restricted content.

Satellite Internet and Online Solutions

  • Starlink is a brilliant service that provides efficient satellite internet anywhere.
  • Other companies are also pushing for similar ideas to provide internet without ground infrastructure.
  • As authoritarianism grows, there will be a massive level of solutions created online to help people get out of restrictive environments.
  • Communities online can provide information on accessing restricted content.

01:32:11 Banning Rojadirecta and the Rise of Streaming Sites

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about Rojadirecta, a Spanish streaming site that was banned due to copyright issues. The speaker explains how banning one site led to the rise of many others, and how communities provided information on accessing these sites.

Banning Rojadirecta

  • Rojadirecta was a Spanish streaming site that was banned due to copyright issues.
  • After it was banned, communities provided information on accessing other streaming sites.
  • Nowadays, it is impossible to ban all streaming sites as new ones will always emerge.

01:34:40 The Fringe: Living Parallel Lives Outside Restricted Environments

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses how only a small percentage of people may choose to live outside restricted environments in the future. The speaker gives an example from their own experience walking through Warsaw.

Living Outside Restricted Environments

  • Only 10-15% of people may choose to live parallel lives outside restricted environments in the future.
  • This is already happening to some extent.
  • The speaker gives an example of walking through Warsaw and seeing the restricted environment.

01:35:49 The Rise of Conspiracy Theories

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss the prevalence of conspiracy theories in modern society and how the internet has contributed to their rise.

The Internet as a Tool for Spreading Conspiracy Theories

  • 01:36:14 The internet provides access to vast amounts of information, but also allows people to believe in unfounded conspiracy theories.
  • 01:36:37 Many people are choosing to believe in conspiracy theories such as Flat Earth or Elvis being alive.
  • 01:37:00 Social media platforms and forums have made it easier for people to spread and share these theories.

Historical Prevalence of Conspiracy Theories

  • 01:37:23 Even before the internet, there were many conspiracy theories that some people believed in.
  • 01:37:42 These theories often went against mainstream beliefs and were not based on logical or scientific evidence.
  • 01:38:04 A significant portion of society may have believed in these theories, although exact numbers are unknown.

Alternative Media vs. Mainstream Media

  • 01:38:27 Some people consider alternative media sources like Joe Rogan’s podcast to be more trustworthy than mainstream media outlets like CNN or BBC.
  • 01:38:50 However, alternative media can also contribute to spreading conspiracy theories.
  • 01:39:34 It is important to distinguish between legitimate alternative viewpoints and unfounded conspiracy theories.

01:41:17 The Internet and Conspiracy Theories

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses how the internet has become a dominant aspect of reality and how it has led to an increase in conspiracy theories.

The Rise of Conspiracy Theories

  • 01:41:43 People are going outside of what is told in mainstream media and started to dig by themselves to look for some information.
  • 01:42:06 A portion of society is willing to dig for information outside of what is told, leading to an increase in conspiracy theories.
  • 01:42:34 There is information fatigue due to the sheer amount of information available outside the mainstream narrative.
  • 01:43:04 Deep fakes make it difficult to research things as they can create realistic pictures or videos that are not true.

01:43:59 AI, Fake News, and Enhanced Humans

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about how AI is developing and accessing information, leading to tools that will help people find the difference between real and fake news. They also discuss how humans will become enhanced in the future.

AI and Fake News

  • 01:43:31 With AI developing, there will be tools that can differentiate between real and fake news.
  • 01:43:59 Throughout human civilization, there have always been fakes because humans like to fake things to achieve certain goals.

Enhanced Humans

  • 01:44:47 In the next 20 years, we will start entering the age of enhanced humans where we’ll have much more power over controlling things with our bodies rather than just devices.
  • 01:45:42 We’re already enhancing human beings with technology such as building connections between brain impulses and lack of limbs.
  • 01:46:20 Devices will be able to divide between reality and non-reality things, and technology will be developed simultaneously to assess this.

01:47:29 Incorporating Technology into the Body

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses his personal experience with incorporating technology into his body and expresses concerns about transhumanism.

Enhancing the Body

  • The speaker already has contact lenses and is getting his eyesight fixed in a few weeks.
  • He believes enhancing one’s own body can be beneficial but feels vulnerable in the technological realm.
  • Transhumanism involves adding components to enhance physical abilities and intellectual capabilities.

Concerns about Transhumanism

  • The speaker is concerned about an authoritarian regime having access to people’s bodies in a binary future.
  • He believes that transhumanism and technology will make most people redundant, underestimating the importance of finding meaning in life.
  • Robotics creates convenience but takes away from the sense of achievement and meaning derived from activities like gardening.

01:51:16 Humans’ Resistance to Change

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about humans’ tendency to resist change, even if it may be theoretically best for them.

Humans Prefer Comfort

  • Humans prefer what they believe they are comfortable with.
  • Cultures develop based on people feeling comfortable in their surroundings.
  • People may refuse technology on a certain level because it does not make them happy.

01:53:15 Technology and Empowerment

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker discusses how technology can be disempowering for individuals who want to understand and tinker with their own devices. He compares the current state of cars, which are heavily reliant on electronic sensors, to older models that could be fixed by individuals without professional help.

Disempowerment of Technology

  • 01:53:58 The speaker finds technology disempowering as a sovereign individual.
  • 01:54:43 He wants to be able to tinker with his own technology and understand it.
  • 01:55:29 Young and old mechanics also dislike the current state of cars that require professional help for repairs.
  • 01:55:49 The interviewer agrees that technology is not always good but acknowledges its ability to simplify processes.

Generational Change

  • 01:57:25 The speaker discusses generational change in terms of knowledge acquisition.
  • 01:57:45 In the past, knowledge was passed down through families or neighbors, but now people rely on technology for information.

01:57:25 Knowledge Acquisition

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about how knowledge acquisition has changed over time. In the past, people relied on family members or neighbors for information. Now, people rely more on technology for information.

Traditional Knowledge Acquisition

  • 01:57:25 At the beginning of the century, people acquired knowledge through family members or neighbors.
  • 01:57:45 For example, if someone wanted to learn how to bake bread they would ask their mother or neighbor.

Current Knowledge Acquisition

  • No bullet points available.

01:58:25 Living in the Virtual Realm

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss the possibility of living in a virtual reality and its impact on individuals.

Finding Pleasure in Other Things

  • The speakers agree that people will find pleasure in other things besides what they currently know.
  • They mention that living in a virtual realm could be one of those things.

Disempowering Nature of Technology

  • One speaker expresses concern about relying too much on technology for meaning and purpose.
  • They question whether having access to all information through technology would make them less self-sufficient as an individual.
  • They argue that relying on circuit boards made by others could lead to a loss of control over one’s life.

02:01:18 Simplifying Our Ways of Achieving Things

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss how humans have simplified their ways of achieving things throughout history and how it will continue to happen with technological advancements.

Story of the Pencil

  • The speakers reference Leonard Reed’s story “I, Pencil” to illustrate how thousands of people are involved in producing even simple objects like pencils.
  • One speaker argues that while they could make a pencil themselves, most people would not be willing to sacrifice so much time and effort for something they can easily buy for cheap.

Progress and Advancement

  • The speakers agree that progress and advancement are necessary for human survival.
  • They argue that finding new ways to achieve progress and happiness is natural and has been happening throughout history.

02:04:04 The Future of Pleasure

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss how people find pleasure in contemporary times and how they will continue to do so in the future.

People’s Time for Pleasure

  • 02:04:04 Most people living in contemporary times have more time for pleasure than in recent history.
  • 02:04:26 People will find ways to achieve pleasure and prosperity, such as investing early in crypto or building interesting projects that bring peace to themselves and their community.

Advancement and Human Aspects of Living

  • 02:04:58 Humans will find ways to advance while also expanding natural aspects of living.
  • 02:05:20 Technology is becoming part of us, which is unprecedented. It follows a simple evolutionary process but now we can cheat evolution by using technology.
  • 02:06:10 The speaker believes that humans have a tendency to find good ways to live, even with technological advancements like phones incorporated into our bodies.

02:05:20 Technological Advancements and Evolution

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss technological advancements and how they affect human evolution.

Outsmarting Evolution

  • 02:05:20 Technology is outsmarting the evolutionary process by allowing us to cheat it through advancements like incorporating phones into our bodies.
  • 02:07:02 Normally, unprecedented things don’t work out as expected.

Free Market Perspective

  • 02:07:21 The free market perspective says that you should see the outcome, which is good for whoever is on the market choosing what they are doing on the market.

Optimism about Humans

  • 02:07:41 Despite concerns about technology’s negative effects, the speaker is optimistic about humans finding good ways to live.
  • 02:08:06 Humans have a tendency to find good ways to live, even with technological advancements.

02:08:31 Gaming and the Future

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss gaming and how it relates to the future.

Contemporary Gaming

  • 02:09:18 Contemporary gaming has phenomenal narratives that are good to follow because they give you a perspective of how certain things can work out.

Horizon Game

  • 02:08:56 The speaker adores the game “Horizon,” which is developed by a Dutch team and set in the future.

02:10:06 A Futuristic World

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker describes a future world where people live in primitive ways and fight with each other. There are also robotic animals made of steel.

The Game

  • 02:10:26 The game is about a girl finding connections between past worlds and their contemporary counterparts.
  • 02:10:48 The game helps players understand that humans will follow the same path even if they exist in the future.
  • 02:11:04 The society lost all human knowledge available to them thousands of years before, but they were able to develop it again.

02:12:05 Technology and Control

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about technology being used to create a digital realm where people have control over everything.

Mimicking Reality

  • 02:12:26 Humans have been moving towards creating a world that they feel control over by mimicking reality in the digital realm.
  • 02:12:53 People can choose to reside in the digital realm where they have control over most things.

Free Market Orientation

  • 02:13:35 People are more individualist-oriented than they realize because they want to live their lives the way they want.
  • 02:14:20 Several constructs prevent people from changing their government towards something better suited for them.

02:15:20 Different Universes and Pursuing Knowledge

Section Overview: In this section, the speaker talks about the concept of different universes and civilizations in space. He also discusses pursuing knowledge and what he would do if he had a one-year sabbatical.

Different Universes and Civilizations

  • The concept of science suggests that there are different universes with different civilizations in space. 02:15:50
  • This realization gives perspective that we know nothing. 02:16:08

Pursuing Knowledge on a Sabbatical

  • If given a one-year sabbatical without financial constraints, the speaker would travel to different countries, talk to people, read as much as possible, and wonder with his girlfriend. 02:16:31
  • The most important thing during this time would be to talk to people without an agenda or producing content like podcasts. 02:17:27
  • The speaker believes that passing on knowledge gained from these conversations is important even if it’s not done on a massive scale. 02:18:15

02:19:22 Scaling Knowledge through Podcasting

Section Overview: In this section, the interviewer asks the speaker about his thoughts on scaling knowledge through podcasting.

One-on-One vs Scaling

  • The interviewer is surprised that the speaker prefers one-on-one conversations over scaling knowledge through podcasting. 02:19:42
  • The speaker agrees that scaling is important for creating change but notes that oversaturation can occur when too many people are talking about similar concepts.02:20:30
  • Instead of jumping on board with others who have an audience, it’s better to come in as a guest once in a while to extend knowledge in an area. Joe Rogan is cited as an example of someone who does this well.02:21:00

02:21:12 Podcasters and Learning

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers discuss the role of podcasters and how they can impact learning. They also talk about the importance of understanding different perspectives on freedom.

Role of Podcasters

  • 02:21:30 Not all podcasters are authors or experts in their field.
  • 02:21:53 Podcasting allows for easy scaling of conversations and can reach millions of people.
  • 02:22:14 Uploading podcasts to RSS feeds can change someone’s life forever.

Understanding Freedom

  • 02:22:34 The speaker has an idea for a documentary project that explores different perspectives on freedom around the world.
  • 02:23:03 Different cultures and individuals have unique perspectives on what freedom means to them.
  • 02:24:14 The speaker is still learning about the world and feels that this project would be better suited for someone with more knowledge.

02:24:40 Conclusion

Section Overview: In this section, the speakers wrap up their conversation and express their enjoyment in discussing these topics.

  • 02:24:40 The speakers enjoyed discussing these topics and hope that others learned from their conversation.
  • No further content after this point.